Making a difference in the community

Stay Informed

Sign up to receive monthly e-updates and connect with others working in local FIMR programs.

 Subscribe Now

Maternal Interviews Can Be Key to Addressing Infant Mortality

Social and environmental influences on infant mortality are one of the focus areas of NICHQ’s national Collaborative Improvement and Innovation Network (CoIIN) to Reduce Infant Mortality initiative, of which NFIMR is a partner. As part of this colloboration, a recent article in the NICHQ newsletter highlights the importance of maternal interviews as well as describes the evidence-based FIMR process. 

 
"Losing an infant is devastating. Not learning from that experience is a tragedy. That's why NFMIR is working to support the expansion of its review programs across the country. Currently, 31 states have implemented one or more Fetal-Infant Mortality Review (FIMR) programs within their borders. The programs collect data and qualitative information in order to provide recommendations to the states, cities and towns they serve for systems change related to preventing fetal and infant deaths.
 
One key element to the success of these FIMR programs is the maternal interview. It's an opportunity to gather details surrounding a baby's death in the mother's own words. "This is so important because we learn how the mother accessed care and interacted with service providers, and get an understanding of her home environment, stress factors and her grieving process," says Jodi Shaefer, RN, PhD, director of NFIMR. "We started this different approach because we needed to hear the mother's voice and learn from her unique insights into community care systems. The interviews also enable us to connect grieving mothers with appropriate supports and resources." 

                                               


© Copyright 2017 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. The National Fetal and Infant Mortality Review Program is a collaborative effort between the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration.